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TIFF 2016 Review: BrOTHERHOOD

The reason that Noel Clarke’s BrOTHERHOOD works so well is that even for those viewers that may be unfamiliar with the previous films, that perhaps do not understand the importance of a character selecting a baseball bat from among other weapons, can still hold our interest. The film works because it explores the age old (hah!) idea that is not relegated to one region over another, that does extend from rich and poor and British  and Canadian and American, which is that one cannot outrun Father Time.

So while we see characters that have grown up from KiDULTHOOD well into the understanding that they’re of a previous generation, there remains a sense of danger with these people, whether they are in their first go round, or their second or their last.

Arnold Oceng, (also appearing in the TIFF film A United Kingdom) is a standout here as Henry, (who was briefly in AdULTHOOD) and Clarke himself has graduated from stock villian to become a star on both sides of the camera. The film’s A TrEAT.

[star v=35]