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Hot Docs 2015 Review: The Sandwich Nazi

A fascinating study of layers of self-awareness and definitely leaves its audience hungry for more.

The documentary The Sandwich Nazi by Canadian Lewis Bennett is successful for one major reason: the way that it handles its subject, deli owner Salem Kahil.

The entire film seems as though Kahil is hamming it up for the cameras, with talk of various types of sex and his experiences as an escort, and to the mysterious stains on the floor of his restaurant, (and sandwiches), but Bennett and his crew are slow and deliberate in revealing that there is much more to Kahil than his boastfulness.

There are a few swerves in The Sandwich Nazi, and while some of them are quite somber, the ones at the end of the film feel absolutely necessary and liberating, (and extremely funny, too)

This is the kind of film that exists to disprove the notion that many documentaries all feel similar, as The Sandwich Nazi is incredibly difficult to classify, and yet feels acutely aware of the levels of artifice.

It is unclear as to whether or not Kahil possesses a similar degree of characterization or not. After all, the title is a take on a Seinfeld episode.

A fascinating study of layers of self-awareness and definitely leaves its audience hungry for more.

4.5