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DVD Review: Alan Partridge

For over twenty years, Steve Coogan has been making Brits laugh with his character Alan Partridge. Beginning as a news-anchor, Partridge became a talk show host, and is now a “mid-morning” radio DJ. In Alan Partride, or Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa as it is known outside of North America, Partridge faces big changes when new management takes over his radio station. After fellow DJ Pat Farrell (Colm Meany) is fired, he proceeds to hold the station hostage. Though Partridge escapes, local police decide to send him back into the building to try and reason with Farrell.

It’s pretty shocking that this is the first time Alan Partridge has made his way overseas, as he is absolutely hilarious. The figure that can be most easily associated with Partridge is Anchorman’s Ron Burgundy. While Burgundy is beyond moronic, Partridge is extremely fun and witty, and is much less tedious to watch. That isn’t to say that Partridge is smart or anything, he’s an idiot; but he is funny for his personality, not his politically incorrect humour. Coogan has been on a bit of a roll for the past couple years, with The Trip and an Oscar nomination for writing Philomena, Alan Partridge is certainly a welcome addition. Coogan once again tackles screenwriting here, with help from Veep creator Armando Iannucci, and the result is uproarious.

Alan Partridge hit shelves this week and it is a must own for comedy lovers. Special features on the DVD/Blu-ray include:

Making of Alan Partridge
The obligatory fifteen minute ‘making of’ bit contains interviews with director Declan Lowney and cast members including Steve Coogan.

Behind the Scenes
Two minutes of footage of the crew making the film backed by a really annoying musical track. Skip it.

AXS TV: A Look at Alan Partridge
A very similar feature to the making of. Contains some of the same material as well as a couple interviews not included in the first making of supplement.

Matt Hoffman

Matthew Hoffman is a Toronto-based cinephile who especially enjoys French films and actresses over the age of 50; including but not limited to: Isabelle Huppert, Meryl Streep, and Jacki Weaver.